If I want to apply for a Home Loan in a Company or Trust Name, Can I?

August 19, 2014 — 1 Comment

Applying for a home loan isn’t always just a personal experience; you may want to consider making an application in the name of a company or a trust.  So is that actually possible and what are the positives and negatives?

Trusts in particular are popular for protection of assets, and tax advantages. It’s important to know where you stand if you’re attempting to borrow as a trust, or as a company; will it really be advantageous?

Borrowing as a trust

Taking on a home loan as a trust doesn’t negate the impact of credit ratings on the decision that’s made by the loan provider.  They will still need to see details of the credit rating of the trust and often of the person who is taking out the loan.   Because a lender will ask to see the legal documentation and operating details of the trust the borrowing process can be complicated.

For this reason not all loan providers will deal with trusts; you will need to identify a provider who will.  It can still be worthwhile dealing with property issues as a trust as it protects property and assets.  A trust also allows for the transfer of such property to beneficiaries if the grantor (person who creates the trust) should die.  This helps to avoid the issues of probate.  Check out NPBS to learn more about their fixed rate home loans and how you can apply today

Borrowing as a company

It’s also possible to take out a home loan in the name of a company.  Again it’s not guaranteed that every provider with have this facility.  You’ll need to approach a provider and discuss your requirements with them.  They will likely need to know details of the property involved and company information.  You need to remember that there will still be credit requirements so you’ll need to provide details of the business credit details, and sometimes your own.

Usually you’ll also be required to sign a personal guarantee for the loan.  It’s worthwhile seeking advice from an attorney to see whether it’s actually advantageous to take out a home loan in a business name, especially when you consider that interest rates can be high if the lenders look on it as a commercial loan.  You need to consider whether it would be easier to take out the loan in your own name.

The issue with lending

It’s possible to apply for a home loan in the name of a trust or a business but it doesn’t necessarily make the process any better for you.  After the problems that were caused by the last housing bubble lenders are a lot more reluctant to agree loans.

Many house purchases are cash transactions, or have a large cash input, as it’s not usually possible to borrow huge percentages of a property purchase pricem, as it once was.  Loan providers are reluctant to provide advances to anyone who doesn’t show the ability to be able to make repayments; this applies whether the application is made in the name of an individual, a trust or a company.



Corey is currently pursuing a Master of Arts degree in religion. While he enjoys learning and writing about Christianity, another one of his new passions is writing about personal finances in order to help others make wise decisions with their money.

One response to If I want to apply for a Home Loan in a Company or Trust Name, Can I?

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